People still ignoring Wanstead danger signs

Jonathan Lethbridge, whose Wanstead Birder blog has become the main source of information for the country’s media about the deaths of birds at Wanstead Flats, has written that people have still been ignoring the danger signs and barriers around Alexandra Lake.

The bird death saga rumbles on. The stupidity of the local populace continues to beggar belief. I’ve seen families walking past the “Biohazard” signs and stepping over the high-viz tape to go and feed the ducks by the lake shore. Fail. The Corporation had to install proper security fencing to stop them. Personally I’d have let Darwinism take it’s course, but there you go

Wanstead news roundup, 20.03.10; UFOs, dead birds, and the under-40s

UFOs were spotted from Wanstead/Leytonstone borders, apparently, according to the UK-UFO website:

Went to feed the foxes in the early hours Friday night when I noticed that all sound had ceased in the garden. Couldn’t hear the trees or M11 sound in the distance of the motorway which you would expect to hear on a Friday night. Looked up and saw 5 lights coming towards the allotments in the sky. Curious as I thought they might be military helicoptors because of the size but realised I could not hear a pin drop. As they got closer I saw they were very bright and in formation and knew then that they were ufo’s. I ran upstairs to my husband and woke him and pulled the curtains open and said ‘now do you believe’?

Picture: Wanstead Birder
There were two arrests following the deaths of at least 80 birds – and one Alsation – at Alexandra Lake on Wanstead Flats. Scientists are still examining the bodies of the birds. More details at Wanstead Birder; picture courtesy Jonathan Lethbridge.

Twice as many couple under 40 who have children can afford to buy houses in Redbridge compared to the rest of London, according to the National Housing and Planning Advice Unit, which basically means family houses are more affordable in Redbridge than they are in other boroughs. The question is why?

Redbridge Council gave permission retrospectively for the demolition of the Truffles chocolate shop – which had been one of Wanstead’s oldest buildings – but they really had no choice: it was pulled down in May last year by a developer who says it turned out to be dangerously unstable. Abdul Rafeeq told the Wanstead Guardian that he will rebuild the house to its original specifications. He faces legal action for the demolition in June.

Nightingale Primary School has been classed as “outstanding” by Ofsted, a dramatic turnaround for head teacher Liz Barrett since she arrived at the school in 1997. Work by the pupils is currently showing in Wanstead Library foyer.

Introduction to Wanstead

Interesting introduction to Wanstead – plus stunning pictures – from Jonathan Lethbridge at the Wanstead Birder blog.

What is now known as Wanstead (from the Anglo Saxon “Wen”, a small hill, and “Stede”, meaning a settlement) once formed the extensive and manicured grounds of Wanstead House, until it was demolished in the 19th century. The owner, one William Wellesley-Long, was somewhat of a gambler, and after losing his fortune on VIIIVIIIVIII.com, had to sell the house – literally, brick by brick