hermonhill

The final installment of Wansteadium’s dissection of an old newspaper which was found in a skip. (For 1971-style news, click here, and for 1971-style Wanstead ads, click here.)

According to the historic inflation calculator at This is Money, inflation since 1971-2010 has amounted to a terrifying-sounding 1038%. Applied to the £15,000 asked for this six-flat house on Hermon Hill, with five garages, makes a total asking price in today’s prices of £170,700. By comparison, a one-bedroom flat sold on Hermon Hill in November for £230,000.

Three-bed semi with garage for £8,250 – that’s £93,885 in today’s prices.

Another of the grand big houses which may well have become a bad flat conversion – same price as the first one mentioned above.

This house might well be identifiable – let us know at wansteadium[at]gmail.com if you know it – and was for sale at an asking price of £23,950 – £272,551 in 2010 prices. A four-bedroom house on Grove Park sold in 2004 for £880,000, and a current estimated valuation is £1.1m

A semi-detached three-bedroom house in Wellington Road sold in October this year for £550,000. The 1971 price, above, is £8,250, or £93,885. Reassuring somehow to see a familiar name of estate agent.

A three-bed semi in the Nightingale Estate sold in September for £410,000. The £10,750 price in 1971 would be £122,335.

• So that’s the end of our 1971 roundup. It’s been fun – if you come across an old Wanstead newspaper under your carpet or in the loft, do drop Wansteadium a line for a repeat performance.

On this night in 1940, at 12.15am, four people were trapped in a house on Hermon Hill after high explosives were dropped by German planes. The gas main was also broken. A few minutes earlier, at 12.10am, high explosives burst a water main at Snaresbrook Station. Then at 12.21am, a house on Monmouth Drive was demolished by explosives, and at 12.23, the gas main at Southview Drive was broken by more bombs.

Former Devon House Interiors on Hermon HillAs Wansteadium noted last week, the “Opening Soon” posters completely covering the windows of the former Devon House Interiors on Hermon Hill are pretty successful at building a sense of anticipation: it’s a large shop, great setting, lots of people passing… what could it be? A restaurant, perhaps? A new cafe? A bookshop even?

Underwhelming as it might seem, Wansteadium has reason to believe it’s going to be a kitchen and bathroom showroom. (Sound of hopes being dashed.)